Judge Considers Unsealing Absentee Ballots In Fulton County, GA Following Credible Allegations of Fraud

Advertisements

In the age of technology, it’s almost impossible to get away with a crime. There are 100 ways to get caught and a criminal may think of 99 of them. But somewhere in the paper or the digital trail, resides the one item that was overlooked. And a diligent, persistent investigator will find it.

In the wake of the 2020 presidential election, over 1,000 poll watchers in swing states signed sworn affidavits stating they had witnessed irregularities on and in the days immediately following Nov. 3.

One of the complainants, Garland Favorito, is the co-founder of the Voters Organized for Trusted Election Results in Georgia, a conservative government watchdog group.

RealClearInvestigations‘ Paul Sperry recounted Favorito’s story. “A curious thing happened as Fulton County, Ga., election officials counted mail-in ballots at Atlanta’s State Farm Arena in the days after the election. In the early hours of Nov. 5, a surge of some 20,000 mail-in votes suddenly appeared for Joe Biden, while approximately 1,000 votes for President Trump mysteriously disappeared from his own totals in the critical swing state.”

Favorito observed this “suspicious shift in votes while monitoring the interim election results on the Georgia secretary of state website.”

In the affidavit Favorito had filed with the secretary of state’s office, he wrote, “I concluded from looking at these results that this was an irregularity, since there was no obvious reason for President Trump’s totals to have decreased while former Vice President Biden’s totals increased dramatically.”

Favorito’s claims, along with virtually all of the other allegations were quickly dismissed by the Georgia Secretary of State’s office.

Refusing to be rejected so easily, he filed a lawsuit in Fulton County Superior Court. At a court hearing held on Monday, Henry County Judge Brian Amero appeared to take his case seriously.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, “Amero may unseal absentee ballots in Fulton County so a government watchdog [Favorito’s group] can investigate allegations of voting fraud in the November election.”

Amero said he’s “inclined to order the ballots to be unsealed and reviewed by experts hired by Favorito.” The ballots are currently under seal in the Fulton County Superior Court Clerk’s Office.

AJC reported:

At Monday’s hearing, Amero said he’s willing to order the absentee ballots to be unsealed if he’s assured their security will not be compromised. He requested a detailed plan, including who would review the ballots, how they would analyze them and how they would secure them.

The judge also discussed a protective order that would prohibit Favorito’s experts from disclosing their work without permission from the court. And he plans to appoint a special master — perhaps a retired superior court judge — to oversee the analysis. If Amero allows it, the review of ballots could begin in late April.

“I can’t sign an order until such time as I’m satisfied that the manner and method (of review) proposed by the petitioners is reasonable,” the judge said.

“We want to do this in such a way that dispels rumors and disinformation and sheds light,” Amero said at the hearing. “The devil’s in the details.”

Favorito is seeking to review absentee ballots in Fulton County. He says county workers fabricated ballots and counted some ballots multiple times on election night. As evidence, his lawsuit cites video of the counting, as well as sworn statements from people who were present.

The observers were suspicious of ballots that were printed on a different stock of paper than regular ballots, appeared to have been printed instead of marked by ink in a voter’s hand or were not creased, indicating they had not been placed in an absentee ballot envelope and mailed.

Naturally, state and county election officials dispute Favorito’s allegations. According to the AJC, these officials have explained that many ballots had been damaged and had to be duplicated before their scanners would process them. The scanners sometimes jam and when that happens, officials said, all of the ballots from a particular batch must be rescanned.

AJC quotes Gabriel Sterling, chief operating officer for the secretary of state’s office, who declared that “the witness statements in the lawsuits are wrong.”

Sterling told a reporter last week that, “It’s not people who are lying, they don’t understand what they’re saying.”

Of course.

Obviously, none of us know what happened with the ballots. But there seems to be too much smoke here for there to be no fire. And taking the Georgia election officials at their word is akin to taking the word of your teenager who swears he didn’t have a party when you were away, even though several bags of beer bottles were found and there’s a huge cigarette burn in the carpet.

Except that the stakes are exponentially greater. In fact, they have already changed the course of America’s future.

The majority of Trump voters, including myself, believe that fraud occurred in the election. We need to pursue each and every one of the allegations made in the sworn affidavits.

I am convinced that somewhere there exists that one detail that was overlooked. We need to find it.